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Halloween is Bad for the Environment Now…

CuteIdeas/shutterstock.com
CuteIdeas/shutterstock.com

You’ve likely heard the saying that everything causes cancer… Basically, it’s another way of saying that so-called experts of the day have labeled a wide variety of things as potentially dangerous to your health, from the toothpaste you used this morning to the pillowcase you’ll lay your head down on this evening.

Well, in the environmental world, there is a similar saying: Everything causes climate change…

And that ‘everything,’ apparently, now includes the favorite of all fall and Halloween traditions, the pumpkin.

Yes, indeed. According to a group of environmentalists at Trees.com, the unassuming pumpkin sitting on your front porch right now is cause for some major concerns, namely the health and life of our planet. Furthermore, they claim that by buying one, or 20, you are only helping to destroy our wonderful world every year.

There’s just one problem with their argument; it’s completely been blown out of proportion.

Take their first complaint against the pumpkin, for example.

According to the article titled “Should we ‘Cancel’ Halloween to save the planet?” Trees.com points out that some 82 percent of all Americans have plans to buy the autumn gourd, many of them more than one. Naturally, this means that literally billions of pounds of pumpkins must be grown and cultivated each and every year. And that’s just for those of us here in the US.

In their eyes, apparently, that’s far too many of one thing grown. Um, have they seen the number of mums grown each year, which are also bought to just sit on a porch?

Besides, did you know that pumpkins, or the act of growing them, actually helps to clean the soil? Trees.com apparently doesn’t.

Each year, hundreds of thousands of farm acres are sprayed with harmful insecticides like DDT, which, while they help the immediate crop being grown from being eaten by pests, can damage and contaminate the soil over time.

And once the soil is polluted, it’s particularly hard to restore it to health. In fact, according to a Science Daily report, most “contaminated sites” require a full excavation of the soil. Then, the damaged soil is either dropped at a landfill or needs to be burned in a very “high-temperature incinerator” to remove the pollution.

However, pumpkins seem to have a magical and all-natural ability to do the same for far less work and money. So more pumpkins mean more clean soil to grow plants and food our nation depends on survival.

But like I said, Trees.com seems to have missed this fact.

They also have a problem with how much natural resources it takes to grow that many pumpkins. And to be clear, pumpkins do need a lot of water. According to the report, just one needs about an inch or so of water per week, and pumpkins take about 10 to 14 weeks to reach maturity. That’s roughly 10 to 14 inches of water for just one pumpkin.

But again, they seem to have forgotten that other plants require about the same amount of water, if not more.

Wheat, for example, matures in about 16 weeks and requires about 12-15 inches of water over that time – so it’s about the same. But no one is out there suggesting we should stop eating bread or pasta…

No one is talking about canceling plants like avocados, rice, sugarcane, or almonds, either, which use a lot more, and I mean a lot, more water than pumpkins, according to a report from CNN.

The last point the article tries to make is that pumpkins are vastly wasted after the fall season. According to the report, about 25 percent of all pumpkins end up in the trash and, then, landfills after before Christmas each year.

And as you may know, any food item, like pumpkins, that are simply tossed in a landfill produces methane gas, the main culprit in what many believe is a climate change crisis. So naturally, our tossed pumpkins aren’t really helping out the climate at all.

Now, to be clear, this is a tragedy of sorts. Like any other food item, pumpkins shouldn’t be tossed out like this. Instead, composting, using them for cooking, feeding livestock, etc., are far better ideas.

However, once again, the article fails to note that other things, natural things no less, produce far more methane than rotting pumpkins – you know, like cows and sheep.

As usual, the environmental left has taken one of America’s favorite past times and turned it into another blight on society. But also, as usual, they’ve misconstrued the whole idea.

So go ahead and buy your pumpkins – just make sure to feed them to the squirrels or make pumpkin pie with them afterward.